Thomas Burgess Sr. of Pittsylvania Co., Virginia

Thomas Burgess Sr. of Pittsylvania Co., Virginia

[Haplotype R1b1]

 

Note: This family is affiliated with that of:
John Burgess of Union Co., South Carolina

Determining the structure of the family of Thomas Burgess Sr. of Pittsylvania Cos., VA has been exceptionally difficult, due to the contradictory nature of the evidence involved, and the almost total absence of citations in on-line sources. The toughest challenge has been in delineating the precise relationship of the sons and grandsons and great-grandsons of Rev. Thomas Burgess Jr. of Warren Co., Tennessee. I’m reasonably certain that the families listed thereunder do in fact descend from Rev. Thomas—but exactly how is still subject to further interpretation. I welcome any additions, corrections, or speculations—and particularly any hard data—from other genealogists who’ve researched this family. This continues to be a work-in-progress. Prof. Michael Burgess, Sept. 2008.

 

Thomas Burgess Sr.

 

Rev. Thomas Burgess Sr. was born by 1714 (he was at least 21 years of age in 1735). He married Mary Warren of Spotsylvania Co. by March 1735, if his daughter Rebecca Rucker’s 4 April 1842 obituary in The Lynchburg Virginian is correct; Rebecca claimed to have been born on 10 December 1735, and died on 23 March 1842 in Amherst Co., Virginia, aged 107 years (a possible but unlikely age for the time); Mary Warren was born on 15 September 1715 (date unconfirmed), and died about 1797 in Pittsylvania Co. Thomas may be related to one of the two Thomas Burgesses transported by George Alves on 16 December 1714 and 11 July 1719 to New Kent Co., Virginia, down the Pamunkey River from what would later became Orange Co.

Thomas had a relative named Edward Burgess, an orphan boy who was bound to him on 15 June 1736, in order to “learn said Edward to read, write, and the trade of carpenter”; Edward has not been found in any other record, and is not the same man as the Edward Burgess who later lived in Pittsylvania Co. The wealthy planter, Charles Burgess, who died in 1732 in Lancaster Co., Virginia, owned thousands of acres of land throughout the Northern Neck, and who is sometimes cited as Edward’s father (he is mentioned as deceased in a 1735 order book of Orange Co.), in fact died without living sons, having had, according to his will, just three surviving daughters—he is not Edward’s father.

Thomas may also have had a relative named George Burgess who is mentioned as providing the security (with Henry Tilly) on a bond issued to Margaret Tilly, administrator of the estate of Lazarus Tilly, in Orange Co. on 28 June 1744; however, the “T” mark recorded with George’s signature suggests that in fact this was Thomas Burgess, and that the record is a mistranscription. Thomas Burgess himself signed a bond in Orange Co. with Margaret for the 26 September 1744 inventory of her husband’s estate (Margaret may be an aunt or sister of Thomas, since she had a son named Burgess Tilly). Margaret also bought 100 acres in Orange Co. from Thomas on 22 March 1749. If George exists, he has not been found in any other record; the only other George Burgess recorded in Virginia during this period married Mary Butt in Norfolk Co., Virginia on 1 June 1711.

Thomas bought 100 acres of land on 4 June 1735 from James Fidler in St. Mark’s Parish (part of St. Thomas’s Parish after 1740), Orange Co. “Burgesses land” [sic] is mentioned in the Orange Co. road repair orders (in the Court Minute books) on 16 March 1735, just two and one-half months after Orange Co. was sliced off from Spotsylvania Co.; but he has not been found in any record of Spotsylvania Co. He served on a grand jury in Orange Co. on 15 May 1736.

Thomas is recorded on the 1739 tithables list in Henry Rice’s District, Orange Co., with one tithe; on 1754 with three tithes; on 1756 with four tithes; on 1757 with two; on 1758 with one; on 1764 with four; and on 1765 with three.

Thomas Burgess is recorded on 26 separate road orders in Orange Co. between 24 September 1742 and 26 April 1765, often building or repairing bridges over the North Anna or Pamunkey Rivers, and earning substantial fees in return. He apparently reinvested this money into land, purchasing 400 acres from Daniel White on 27 September 1746, and 133 acres from William Pratt on 26 March 1747 (part of these tracts were deeded by him to Timothy Burgess, his oldest son, and Joseph Rogers, his son-in-law, in 1760). He is mentioned in the 21 February 1750/51 O.S. Spotsylvania Co. will of his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Warren. He purchased land from William and Elizabeth Golding in September 1754. He sold part of his farm in 1756 to John Holloway, another section in 1758 to James Davis, another on 24 March 1763 to Benjamin Haley, and 123 acres on 31 August 1765. He made two gifts of land on 23 October 1760 to his son, Timothy Burgess, and his son-in-law, Joseph Rogers.

Thomas obtained an annual license as an “ordinary” on 23 October 1755, and renewed it on 28 February 1760 and 23 April 1761.

Thomas Burgess lost a suit prosecuted by James Mills, assignee of Charles and Peter Copland, on 28 November 1755. William Flanigan was convicted on 25 May 1756 of “stealing a purse and some silver” from Thomas. On 24 September 1756 Thomas Burgess and William Hensley lost a suit prosecuted by Charles and Peter Copland. Richard Thomas and John Clayton prosecuted a suit against Thomas Burgess and Andrew Mannen on 22 September 1757. Thomas prosecuted Thomas Daughana and James McGennis on 28 November 1760 for “trespass, assault, and battery.” On 25 June 1761 Thomas was paid thirteen shillings by Orange Co. for repairing the “Prison doors.”

On 7 February 1769 Thomas bought 590 acres on Winns Creek, Antrim Parish, Halifax Co., Virginia from John and Jemima Kearby (or Kirby or Kerby). He is recorded on the 1768 tithables list in the districts of both John Lewis and Nathaniel Terry (unless one of these is his son, Thomas Jr.), and again in 1769 in Lewis’s district. He sold 150 acres of this land on 18 April 1776 to William Dixon. He or his son, Thomas Jr., may be listed on the 1777 tax records of the Lawrence District, Caswell Co., North Carolina (across the state line from Pittsylvania Co.). As Thomas Burgess Sr., he bought (with Silvanus Stokes) another 100 acres from Duncan McDonald of Caswell Co., North Carolina, on 20 November 1777 in Halifax Co. In 1777 he is recorded on the Oath of Allegiance list of neighboring Pittsylvania Co., Virginia (this could also be his son, Rev. Thomas). He sold 150 acres of his Halifax land to Edmund Dixon on 18 June 1778, and another 290 acres on Winns (or Wynns) Creek to James Brooks on 1 November 1783 (he is then noted as being a resident of Pittsylvania Co., which had split off from Halifax Co. on 1 June 1767).

On 13 June 1780 he bought 92 acres in Camden Parish in Pittsylvania Co. He bought another 740 acres on Sweden Fork (or Sweetings Fork) in Camden Parish in Pittsylvania Co. on 15 February 1782 from Theoderick Carter—among the witnesses are Thomas Burgess Jr. and William Burgess, with the father being specifically called “Thomas Burgess Senior,” plus several of the Kerby family.

Thomas is listed on the 1782-85 and 1787 personal property tax lists for Pittsylvania Co., Virginia, but in 1785 and 1787 is noted as exempt from the tax, and thereafter is dropped from the rolls; Mary Burgess is recorded as head of the family on the tax lists from 16 April 1792-21 March 1797, the year in which she apparently died. Thomas is also listed on the land tax records there from 1782-96, always with 740 acres, consistently being listed “Thomas Burgess Sr.”; in 1797-98 the records list him as “Thomas Burgess dec’d.”

Thomas Burgess Sr. died in Pittsylvania Co. before 16 April 1792; his estate was appraised on 19 October 1792. His 740-acre farm on Sweden Fork was sold on 1 April 1799 (after his wife’s death) to his youngest son William by his surviving heirs—Thomas Burgess Jr. and wife Elizabeth Burgess, Rebecca (Burgess) and Anthony Rucker, Elizabeth (Burgess) and Joseph Rogers, Nancy ([name probably originally Ann] Burgess) and William Stuart, and Mary (Burgess) and Martin Hardin; Timothy Burgess, who was apparently regarded as already having received his share of his father’s estate in Thomas’s 1760 deed of sale, did not participate. Thomas Burgess Sr. had at least three sons and four daughters:

 

*1. Rev. Timothy Burgess Sr. (1737?-1807) of Kershaw District, SC, and Russell Co., VA
*2. Rev. Thomas Burgess Jr. (1754?-1828) of Warren Co., TN
*3. William Burgess Sr. (1756?-1810/20+) of Lincoln Co., KY

 

First Branch: Rev. Timothy Burgess Sr.

 

Rev. Timothy Burgess Sr. was born by 1737 in Orange Co., Virginia (he was at least 21 years of age in 1758). He married Martha “Patty” __ by 1760.

Rev. Timothy is listed as a witness in the Orange Co. court in April of 1758. He is listed on the 1759, 1764, and 1765 tithables list there. In February of 1760 he presented “into Court a certificate for taking up a runaway Negro man named Dick.” Timothy was named Constable of Orange Co. on 28 August 1760, was sworn in on 25 September 1760, and served until 25 June 1761. On 23 October 1760 Thomas Burgess Sr. gifted 333 acres of land in Orange Co. to Timothy Burgess “for natural love and fatherly affection,” thereby firmly establishing the relationship between the two men; the deed was apparently made to give Timothy a living, perhaps in celebration of his marriage, and should be regarded as his inheritance, since he did not participate in the later division of Thomas’s estate (a not uncommon practice during this period). He is listed a half dozen times in the Orange Co. Order Books in the early 1760s.

Rev. Timothy bought 100 acres on Winns Creek (or Wynns Creek) in Halifax Co., Virginia, adjoining his father’s land, on 19 April 1774 from Henry Hardin (or Harden) Sr., father-in-law of Timothy’s younger brother, William Burgess; he sold this farm to James Brooks on 17 November 1783 (registered on 17 June 1784, the same date as his father’s last land sale in Halifax, with Thomas Burgess Sr. and Henry Hardin Sr. witnessing the transaction). He is listed as a witness with his brother Thomas Jr. on 23 August 1775 in Halifax Co., Virginia, to the sale of 135 acres by John Hodge of Orange Co., North Carolina to James Dixon of Halifax Co., and 60 acres by John Hodge to John Smither of Orange Co., North Carolina. He sold 100 acres of land on Winns Creek on 17 November 1783 to James Brooks, bounded by the land of Thomas Burgess Sr. and Henry Harden Sr., among others.

On 28 September 1774 Rev. Timothy witnessed the will of Jonathan Deweese in Caswell Co., North Carolina, just across the state line from Pittsylvania Co., and is also recorded on the 1777 and 1780 tax lists in the Gloucester District there. He bought 550 acres of land on the South Hico River in Caswell Co. on 11 July 1778, but sold 450 acres of it to William Stewart on 7 October 1780. A deed from William Lee to Herndon Harrelson dated 7 October 1780 in Caswell Co. mentions the tract being sold as next to Timothy’s land. Timothy is listed in the 1786 state census in the Gloucester District there with four sons under the age of 21.

However, Rev. Timothy’s daughter Susannah married William Bridgewater in Pittsylvania Co. on 8 January 1784, and his daughter Elizabeth married Henry Campbell there on 1 March 1784. Timothy himself does not appear on any Pittsylvania Co. tax list.

Rev. Timothy purchased several Revolutionary War land warrants (#11797 and #11998—one of them from Christian Borden), in Washington Co. (later Russell Co.), Virginia, totaling over a thousand acres of land near Clinch Mountain and Cedar Creek near the Clinch River, being confirmed in their possession on 24 August 1781, 26 April 1782, and 13 May 1782, with a survey being done on 15 January 1783 (part of this land was assigned by Timothy to Edward Smoot), but did not apparently live on this estate until later.

Rev. Timothy settled in Russell Co., Virginia after 1786, the year that Russell was created from Washington Co., and was licensed as a Baptist minister there on 18 November 1788 and again on 24 December 1799; he is also noted as having co-founded the Glade Hollow Baptist Church in 1788. He purchased 870 acres in Glade Hollow on 16 August 1794.

Rev. Timothy is listed on the personal and land property tax lists for the Upper District of Russell Co., Virginia from 1789-1806 (except for 1800, which is lost); he is noted as tax exempt in the court minutes on 23 July 1793, “on account of age and infirmities,” and he is not charged any poll tax starting in 1798. His estate of 1,631 acres is also recorded on the 1814 land tax record there. He has not been found in the 1790 or 1800 censuses, which are lost for Virginia. He and his wife sold some of his property in Russell Co. between 23 March 1802 and 29 August 1806.

Rev. Timothy may have moved shortly thereafter to his estate in the Kershaw District in South Carolina in 1806. He died in 1807; his will, which is dated 30 July 1807 and was probated on 18 August 1807 and 26 May 1819 in the Kershaw District, and on 6 July 1819 in Russell Co., Virginia, states that he had five sons and two daughters, three of whom predeceased him (James, Timothy Jr., and Elizabeth), as had also, apparently, his wife:

 

*1. John Burgess Sr. (1761?-1826) of Kershaw District, SC and Russell Co., VA
2. James Burgess (1763?-1792?) of Russell Co., VA; listed on the 1784 personal property tax list of Washington Co., VA, and from 1789-90 and in 1792 in Russell Co., VA, but died before 1807 (probably in 1792), as recorded in his father’s will, apparently leaving one or more unnamed heirs, who are still underaged in 1807
*3. Thomas Burgess III (1773?-1820?) of Russell Co., VA
*4. William Burgess II (1773?-1810?) of Russell Co., VA
5. Timothy Burgess Jr. (1775?-1800?) of Russell Co., VA; mentioned in the Russell Co., VA, court minutes of 26 April 1797 and 23 August 1800 as a drunkard, but died childless before 1807, as mentioned in his father’s will

 

First Son of Rev. Timothy Sr.

 

John Burgess Sr. was born about 1761 in Orange Co., Virginia. He is not the same man as John Burgess, his presumed cousin, who was born about 1769, and who lived in the Union District, South Carolina. He married Tamson “Tamzey” Gardiner about 1782. He is listed in the 1800-20 censuses for the Kershaw District (in 1800 with one son aged 10-16, and one under the age of 10, and four daughters, in 1810 with one son aged 16-26 and two daughters, and in 1820 with one son aged 16-26, and a grandson (?) under the age of 10); his wife is listed as head of the family in 1830 (aged 70-80). John owned substantial tracts of land in the Kershaw District, South Carolina, and in Russell Co., Virginia, inheriting them from his father. He does not appear in any of the Russell Co. personal property tax lists, suggesting that he usually lived in the Kershaw District. He died in the Kershaw District between 12 February 1826 and 4 March 1826; his will was probated on the latter date in the Kershaw District, and on 26 March 1827 in Russell Co. He had two surviving sons:

 

1. Timothy Burgess III (1788-1856) of Pickens Co., AL
2. John Burgess Jr. (1795-1849) of Kershaw Co., SC

 

First Son of John Sr.

 

Timothy Burgess III was born on 14 June 1788 in the Kershaw District, South Carolina. He married Delphia Gardner on 29 March 1810 in the Kershaw District. He is listed in the 1810 census for Kershaw, with no children, and in 1820 there with one son aged 10-16 and two sons under the age of 10; in the 1823-34 personal property tax records of Russell Co., Virginia, and also in the 1830 census there, with one son aged 15-20, two aged 5-10, and two under the age of 5, plus two daughters; and in the 1840-50 censuses in Pickens Co., Alabama (in 1840 with one son aged 20-30, one aged 15-20, one aged 10-15, and one aged 5-10). He died there on 30 April 1856, having had six sons:

 

1. John George Burgess (1811-1860+) of Scott Co., MS; he is listed in the 1833 personal property tax list of Russell Co., VA
2. Daniel Gardner Burgess (1818-1891) of De Soto Parish, LA
3. (David) William Burgess (1820-1880) of Hinds Co., MS
4. Louis Jefferson Burgess, also called Lewis Jefferson Burgess (1826-1891) of Madison Co., MS
5. Timothy Marion Burgess (1829-1869) of Scott Co., MS; he may have served as a Capt. in the 46th Mississippi Infantry, Confederate Army during the Civil War; he is listed in the 1870 mortality census for Scott Co. as having died there the previous December of typhoid fever
6. William Henry Burgess (1840-1845?), died young

 

Third Son of Rev. Timothy Sr.

 

Thomas Burgess III was born about 1773 in Virginia. His wife’s name is unknown. He is recorded on the 1795-96 and 1801-05 personal property tax lists of Russell Co., VA, on the 1796-98, 1809-18, and 1820 lists of Washington Co., VA, and on the 1810-20 censuses there—in 1810 with one son aged 10-16, three sons under the age of 10, and two daughters, and in 1820 with no sons and two daughters. He served as a witness in Russell Co. in September 1802. Thomas Burgess had at least four sons, according to the census records; however, those listed below could also be sons of Thomas’s brother, William Burgess II:

 

*1. William Burgess III (1794?-1870+) of Smyth Co., VA
2. Robert Burgess I (1800?-1845?) of Washington Co., VA; his wife’s name is unknown; he is listed in the 1820 census for Washington Co. with no wife or children, aged 16-26, and in 1840 there with one son aged 5-10, Robert and wife aged 40-50, and a woman aged 80-90; he has not been found in 1830; he is listed on the 1820, 1823-24, 1830-33, 1835, and 1841-45 personal property tax lists for Washington Co., in 1826-28 in Russell Co., Virginia, and in 1832 and 1836-39 in Smyth Co.
3. Son
4. Son

 

First Son of Thomas III

 

William Burgess III was born about 1794 in Virginia; he is also called William T. Burgess by one of his descendants. He married Margaret __ about 1820. He is listed in the 1830 and 1850 censuses for Washington Co., Virginia, in 1830 with one son aged 5-10 and two sons under the age of 5, but has not been found in 1820 or 1840; however, a corner of the “B” surname page of the 1840 Smyth Co. census is cut off, losing five names but preserving the data; he may be the individual listed with two sons aged 20-30, one son aged 10-15, and one aged 5-10); he is listed in 1860 in Russell Co., Virginia (aged 66 years), and in 1870 in both Russell and Smyth Cos., Virginia (aged 76 years), living with or visiting two of his children, Eleanor and Mitchell, a month apart. He is also listed in the personal property tax records of Washington Co., Virginia from 1819, 1823-25, 1828, 1830-32, and 1850 (in 1850 with his son Thomas, so identified), and in Smyth Co., Virginia from its founding in 1832-34, 1836-39, and 1841-43. William Burgess died in Russell or Smyth Co. between 1870-80, having had at least four sons:

 

*1. Mitchell Thurman Burgess (1824?-1888+) of Smyth Co., VA
2. Son (1826-1840+) of Smyth Co., VA
3. Thomas Burgess V (1830?-1870?) of Wayne Co., WV
4. Robert Burgess II (1834-1900+) of Greenup Co., KY

 

First Son of William III

 

Mitchell Thurman Burgess was born about 1824 in Russell Co., Virginia (the place of birth noted in the  death certificate of his daughter, Tilda Chapman, on 4 November 1926); he may have been named for Mitchell Thurman of Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. He married firstly Mary Cleghorn on 16 October 1844 in Smyth Co., VA, and secondly Martha Ann Taylor in Smyth Co. on 30 October 1847. He is listed in the 1850-80 censuses for Smyth Co., Virginia, and in the personal property tax records there from 1844. He served in the 6th Battalion, Virginia Reserves, Confederate Army, during the Civil War. On 27 February 1888 he and his wife sold their interest in the 200-acre tract jointly inherited by his wife from the estate of her father, Thomas Taylor. He died between 1888-1900 in Smyth Co., having had four sons:

 

1. Thomas A. Burgess (1857-1936) of Smyth Co., VA
2. Robert Thurman Burgess (1858?-1937) of Smyth Co., VA (his death certificate gives his year of birth as 1861, but he is recorded on the 1860 census as aged 2 years)
3. John B. Burgess (1866?-1886+) of Smyth Co., VA
4. Mitchell B. Burgess (1872-1930+) of Smyth Co., VA

 

Fourth Son of Rev. Timothy Sr.

 

William Burgess II was born about 1773 in Virginia. His wife’s name is unknown. He is recorded in the 1795-96, 1802, and 1804 personal property tax lists of Russell Co., VA, and on the 1799-1801, 1806, and 1809-10 tax lists of Washington Co., VA, and in the 1810 census there twice; the first rendition lists two sons under the age of 10 plus six daughters, while the second lists the same two sons, but only four daughters. He is mentioned as a witness on 23 March 1802 in the Russell Co. court records, and was named co-executor of his father’s estate in 1807. His failure to act in that capacity in Rev. Timothy’s 1819 Russell Co. probate suggests that he was dead by then. He probably died in Washington Co. in 1810, having had at least two sons. One or more of the sons listed for his brother, Thomas Burgess, may actually be his.

 

1. Son (born between 1800-10)
2. Son (born between 1800-10)

 

Second Branch: Rev. Thomas Burgess Jr.

 

Rev. Thomas Burgess Jr. was born by 1754 in Orange Co., Virginia (he is listed as over the age of 45 in the 1800 census, and witnessed two deeds on 23 August 1775 in Halifax Co., Virginia, when he had to have been at least 21 years of age). He married Elizabeth __ about 1777; she was born about 1755 (she is listed as age 26-45 in 1800), and died before 1820; she may have been the daughter of John Kirby and Jemima Bolling of Halifax Co., Virginia, and Union Co., South Carolina.

Rev. Thomas is listed as a witness with his brother Timothy on 23 August 1775 in Halifax Co., Virginia, to the sale of 135 acres by John Hodge of Orange Co., North Carolina to James Dixon of Halifax Co., and 60 acres by John Hodge to John Smither of Orange Co., North Carolina. He or his father, Thomas Sr., may be listed on the 1777 tax records of the St. Lawrence District, Caswell (later Person) Co., North Carolina (across the state line from Pittsylvania Co.). He is listed on the Pittsylvania Co., Virginia personal property tax lists from 1782-92, sometimes as “Thomas Burgess Jr.”, and on the land tax records there from 1782-85 (with 400 acres), 1786-90 (624 acres), 1791-92 (408 acres), 1793 (258 acres), and 1797-1800 (a land patent of 150 acres). He sold 150 acres on Sandy Creek in Pittsylvania Co. on 29 December 1792 (recorded on 15 April 1793) to Samuel Constable. He participated in the sale of his father’s estate to his brother William in Pittsylvania Co. on 1 April 1799. He sold the remainder of his land in Pittsylvania Co. (505 acres on Sandy Creek) on 11 November 1800 (recorded 15 June 1801, and witnessed by his brother-in-law, Martin Hardin), with Thomas being specifically noted as a citizen of the Spartanburg District, South Carolina.

Rev. Thomas moved to the Spartanburg District in 1792. He purchased 114 acres of land there on the Pacolet River from Edward Stubblefield for twenty-five cents on 9 October 1795, and an additional 486 acres of land on the south side of the Pacolet River from Stubblefield there on 23 August 1799—and then sold 50 acres back to him on 9 October 1800. He sold another 24 acres to John Morris on 24 April 1802. Thomas is listed there in the 1800 census, with one son aged 16-26 and one aged 10-16, five daughters, and a wife aged 26-45.

The history of the South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805, by Leah Townsend (1935), notes that Thomas helped reconstitute the Boiling Spring Church in 1792. He was one of two ordained Ministers serving the Buck Creek Church from 1793-94, and again from 1796-97, and served as Pastor of the Goucher Creek Church in 1794-95. He was asked by the Cedar Spring Baptist Church in 1795 to share his ministerial services, but replied: “We are cramp’d in the same place that you are. Our Minister has his appointments laid out so as to fill up every Saturday in each month, and cannot alter his monthly meetins [sic] at present….” He served as Presiding Minister of the Boiling Spring Church from 1797-1801, of the Greens Creek Church from 1801-02, and of the New Salem Church in 1803. He issued a circular letter, “Intemperance: A Prevailing Vice,” in 1801/02. He was formerly dismissed from the Boiling Spring Church with a letter of recommendation in 1806, indicating that he would depart shortly thereafter.

On 5 February 1807 he filed a power of attorney to Samuel Gilbert in Spartanburg District to “rent or sell his land…. Thomas Burgess is about to leave Spartanburgh [sic] District.” Gilbert then sold Thomas’s remaining 130-acre farm on the Pacolet River on 1 June 1818 to John Nolen.

(Rev. Thomas is not the same person as Thomas Burgess of Campbell Co., Virginia [a neighboring county to Pittsylvania Co.], a Pennsylvania Quaker who was a son of Joseph Burgess, and is listed there in the deed records from 1803-07. He is also not the same person as the Thomas Burgess Sr. who lived from 8 February 1815 just north of the Falling Water River in White [later Putnam] Co., Tennessee; this later Thomas [1776?-1830] is known to be a descendant of William Burgess of King George Co., Virginia [please see that family]. However, the Thomas Burgess Jr. listed in the 1830 census for White Co. remains unidentified—he cannot be the Falling Water River Thomas’s son, Thomas, who is underaged at this time, and Rev. Thomas’s son, Thomas H. Burgess, is already listed in Hickman Co.)

Although he does not appear to have served in the Revolutionary War, Rev. Thomas purchased a military bounty warrant (#824, also called #431) and filed it on 27 June 1793 with the State of North Carolina, claiming 640 acres of land on the Caney Fork River in Sumner Co., North Carolina (later Warren Co., Tennessee). He recorded a power of attorney in Spartanburg Co. on 25 February 1795 to Alston Edney of Davidson Co. of the “territory south of the Ohio River” [Tennessee] to get title to the 640 acres and to make Thomas Huggings a title to 320 acres of it.

However, Warren Co. was not settled by Europeans until 1806, the year before Thomas left South Carolina. On 8 August 1808, his son, Thomas H. Burgess, is listed as a witness on a land survey. His daughter Jemima wed Thomas Stuart in the same year; he stated in a published notice on 1 September 1809: “I was married on the 4th of December [1808] to Jemima Burgess, the daughter of Thomas Burgess of Warren County, Tennessee. After eight months of marriage, I have has [sic] nothing but trouble, distress, and uneasiness of mind. I am no longer responsible for debts of her contracting.” Jemima remarried John Cooksey by 1816.

Rev. Thomas, or possibly his son, Thomas Henry, was elected Sheriff of Warren Co. in 1809. Thomas also established one or more Baptist churches there. He appears on the 1812 tax list for Warren Co. with Warren Burgess, his presumed second son, having been appointed to take the levy in his district; and is also listed there in the 1820 census (the 1810 census for Warren Co. having been lost), with two boys under the age of 10 and no females; these are presumably two of his grandsons.

Rev. Thomas received 100 acres of land on Mountain Creek and Caney Fork in the First District of Warren Co. from the State of Tennessee (Grant #3740) on 17 February 1812, adjoining a 200-acre farm that he already owned. He witnessed a deed in neighboring White Co., Tennessee on 18 January 1816. He sold the 100 acres granted to him by the State of Tennessee to John Holland on 1 April 1819 in Warren Co. The small town of Chismsburg (which no longer exists) was founded on his land in 1819.

Together with his son, Thomas H. Burgess, Rev. Thomas purchased 140 acres in White Co. on the north side of Caney Fork from Henry Neill on 12 April 1819, but on 6 September 1822, he sold his 70-acre share of this land to his son, Thomas H. Burgess, with John Cooksey, Philip Kirby, and Peter Burgess witnessing the transaction. In 1824 he is noted as being a slave owner in Warren Co. On 31 May 1824 he filed a survey in Warren Co. (Entry #89) for a 50-acre plot on Caney Fork with “said Burgess’ house, at the foot of a large mountain, with meanders of said mountain, including the house & improvements whereon said Burgess now lives”; his son, Peter Burgess, acted as witness. Another survey dated 2 January 1826 (Entry #1170) mentions “Burgess’ fish trap, near an old house built by John Cooksey, corner of the tract the said Thomas Burgess now lives on.” Other surveys mention “Burgess Creek” in Warren Co. An 1826 plat record mentions Thomas’s 140-acre tract on Pine Creek.

Rev. Thomas died in Warren Co. by late 1828—his estate inventory, which was filed in court on 3 April 1829, mentions two notes due on 15 November 1828, plus a will that was apparently never probated. On 26 June 1829 six of his surviving heirs—Thomas H. Burgess, Peter Burgess, and his daughters and/or sons-in-law Polly Fore (i.e., Mary Burgess Fore, widow of Peter J. Fore Sr.), John Cooksey or Cooksie (husband of Jemima Burgess), Philip Kerby (or Kirby) (husband of Sara Burgess), and Moses Rambo (husband of Nancy [probably originally Ann] Burgess)—filed a deed in Hickman Co. giving their power of attorney to John Cooksey to represent their interests before the Warren Co. Court in the probate of Thomas’s estate; evidently, they didn’t trust John Martin, the court-appointed executor. This deed was amended and refiled in Warren Co. on 25 November 1833, appointing Broomfield L. Ridley and James P. Thompson as their attorneys, but without Polly Fore’s participation.

This may not be a complete list of Rev. Thomas’s surviving heirs; these six individuals just happened to be living in Hickman Co., Kentucky at the time, where they are all listed together in the 1830 census (the census also indicates that Nancy and Sara had died by 1830). The 4 October 1834 settlement of Thomas’s estate in Warren Co. fails to mention any payouts—only that a $950.65 estate had been reduced through the executor’s expenses to just $273. Rev. Thomas had at least three sons and five daughters:

 

*1. Thomas Henry Burgess I (1778?-1839?) of Van Buren Co., AR
2. Warren Burgess I (1784?-1815?) of Warren Co., TN; he is listed in the 1812 tax list for Warren Co. with his father, and served in the War of 1812 in the 2nd Regiment, West Tennessee Militia, from 20 September 1814 to 31 December 1814; he appears to have died before 1820 (probably by 1815); his heirs, if any, are unknown, but could conceivably include some of the children now recorded under his brother, Thomas Henry I
*3. Peter Burgess Sr. (1790?-1837?) of Hickman Co., KY

 

First Son of Rev. Thomas Jr.

 

Thomas Henry Burgess I was born about 1778, probably in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. He appears to have married twice, firstly about 1799 to an unknown wife, and secondly about 1811 to Nancy __; his second wife’s name is mentioned on his 1834 deed of sale; she is too young, according to the 1830 census, to have been the mother of his older sons.

Thomas Henry moved with his father from Spartanburg Co., South Carolina to Warren Co., Tennessee, about 1807. He witnessed a land survey there for James Parrat on 8 August 1808. Thomas Henry, or possibly his father, Rev. Thomas Jr., was elected Sheriff of Warren Co. in 1809. On 12 April 1819, together with his father, Rev. Thomas Burgess, he purchased 140 acres from Henry Neill on the north side of Caney Fork in neighboring White Co., Tennessee; on 6 September 1822 his father sold him his 70-acre half of this farm, with John Cooksey, Philip Kirby, and Peter Burgess witnessing the transaction. He has not been found in the 1800-20 censuses (the 1810 census for Warren Co. does not survive). He is mentioned in Warren Co. plat records of 25 February 1828 and 4 July 1829 as having once owned a 50-acre farm “now belonging to John Cain.”

Thomas Henry moved to Hickman Co., Kentucky with his brother, Peter Burgess, and four brothers-in-law sometime in the mid 1820s, where he is listed in the 1826-34 property tax lists (however, the 1830-33 lists are missing; in 1829 he owns 370 acres, and in 1834 320 acres), and in 1830 on his only known census record, aged 50-60 years, with a wife aged 30-40, and five sons, two aged 15-20, one aged 10-15, and two under the age of 5. Living nearby are two of his presumed older sons, William Burgess and John Burgess. He assumed a mortgage with Benjamin Mason for a 160-acre farm in Hickman Co. on 26 April 1834, making his final payment and obtaining ownership of the land on 15 October 1834—and then sold it on 14 [sic] October 1834 to Aaron Jones.

Thomas Henry moved to Van Buren Co., Arkansas about 1835, where he is listed on the 1837-39 personal property tax lists together with several of his younger sons, variously as H. Thomas Burgess or Thomas H. Burgess. He presumably died there about 1839, having had at least eight sons, the first three probably by his first wife, and the last five by his second. It should be noted that Thomas Henry’s relationships to his sons, as with so many others in this family, cannot be established conclusively, but only through association and by inference, and should therefore be regarded as speculative:

 

*1. William Hiram Burgess (1800?-1860+) of Hickman Co., KY
*2. John M. Burgess I (1805?-1868) of Chickasaw Co., MS
*3. Thomas W. Burgess (1808?-1849) of Wayne Co., TN
*4. Gabriel Burgess Sr. (1812?-1857) of Jackson Co., AR
*5. Warren Burgess II (1815?-1856?) of Van Buren Co., AR
6. Laru Burgess I (1818?-1843+) of Jackson Co., AR; he is listed in the 1840 census for Van Buren Co., AR, with two males aged 15-20, one aged 10-15, and one aged 5-10 (apparently the residue of his late father’s surviving family); he married Mecca Elmore (aged 18) in Jackson Co., AR on 19 March 1843, when his age is given as 24 years; neither he nor his wife have been found in any subsequent record
7. Son (1825?- )
8. Son (1827?- )

 

First Son of Thomas Henry

 

William Hiram Burgess, also called William Burgess and Hiram William Burgess, was born about 1800, probably in Spartanburg Co., South Carolina (he is listed as age 51 in 1850, 59 in 1860, and 70 in 1870). He has not been found with a middle initial in any known record, always being called “William Burgess.” He married Rebecca Hughes about 1820 (she died in September 1869). William is listed in the 1820 census for Warren Co., Tennessee, aged 16-26, with a wife and no children, and is recorded as a member of the Rocky River Primitive Baptist Church there in 1828. He is listed in the 1828-1854+ property tax lists of Hickman Co., Kentucky (with Thomas H. Burgess from 1828-34; in 1829 he owns 160 acres, in 1834 240 acres, from 1835 160 acres, and from 1842 200 acres), and also in the 1830-70 censuses there (in 1830 with two sons under the age of 5, two daughters, and two men aged 20-30, and in 1840 with two sons aged 10-15, one son aged 5-10, and one under the age of 5, plus five daughters). He bought 160 acres of land in Hickman Co. from Josiah Shields on 25 October 1834. He apparently died there between 1870-80, having had at least six sons:

 

1. Thomas Henry Burgess III (1826-1870+) of Ballard Co., KY
2. Son (1828?- )
3. Gabriel Burgess II (1833-1872) of Howell Co., MO
4. William L. Burgess (1840-1870+) of Hickman Co., KY
5. Jesse Hughes Burgess (1843-1910+) of Graves Co., KY
6. (Winfield) Scott Burgess (1848-1890) of Hickman Co., KY

 

Second Son of Thomas Henry

 

John M. Burgess I was born about 1805, probably in
Spartanburg Co., South Carolina. His middle name may be Martin or Melmoth. He married twice, firstly about 1825 to an unknown wife, and secondly about 1848 to a widow, Elender “Nelly” (Harris) Thompson. He is listed in the 1820 census for White Co., Tennessee (if this is him), with one son and one daughter under the age of 10, and himself aged 26-45; in 1830 in Hickman Co., Kentucky, with no sons, three daughters, and two males aged 20-30 (a brother?); and in 1840 in Weakley Co., Tennessee (just over the state line from Hickman), with one son aged 10-15, one 5-10, and one under 5, and apparently the same adult male recorded in 1830 (aged 20-30). He is also listed in the Hickman Co. property tax records in 1826, next to Thomas H. Burgess (the 1827 list is illegible, and 1830-33 are missing). He is listed in the 1833 land record book for Weakley Co., and appears in the tax records there for District 8 from 1842-44, but is missing in 1845.

John witnessed two deeds in Wayne Co., Tennessee, on 26-27 March 1825, and again on 22 September 1832, and is recorded there on the 1836 tax list. He is mentioned there on 18 February 1837 as witnessing a deed, and on 27 July 1837 as owing a debt to Sessums & McDougal. He moved to Chickasaw Co., Mississippi, by 1848, when he appears on the tax list there, and also on the 1850-60 censuses. He died there in 1868, having had at least four sons by his first wife:

 

1. Son (1825?- )
2. M. L. Burgess (1830?- ), name unverified
*3. Rev. James William Burgess (1832?-1890) of Calhoun Co., MS
4. William Burgess IV (1835?- ), name unverified

 

Third Son of John M.

 

Rev. James William Burgess was born about 1832, probably in Weakley Co., Tennessee. He married Mentie Ethie McKee about 1858 in Chickasaw Co., Mississippi. He is listed in the 1850-70 censuses for Chickasaw Co., and in 1880 in Calhoun Co., Mississippi. He was a renowned Baptist minister in Calhoun Co. He died there in 1890, having had six sons:

 

1. James Melmoth Burgess (1865-1910) of Calhoun Co., MS
2. Franklin Lee Burgess (1870-1900+) of Calhoun Co., MS
3. Henry Allen Burgess (1872-1880+)
4. Warren S. Burgess (1877?-1895?), died childless
5. Rev. George Lafayette Burgess (1880-1928) of Sunflower Co., MS
6. Wiley Burgess (1881-1930+) of Pontotoc Co., MS

 

Third Son of Thomas Henry

 

Thomas W. Burgess was born about 1808, probably in Warren Co., Tennessee. He married Mary “Polly” Hill, daughter of John Hill, about 1826; she remarried __ Davis after his death. He mortgaged his livestock to William H. Patton in Wayne Co. on 7 March 1835, is listed in the 1836 tax there with his presumed brother, John M. Burgess, and also in 1838; and in the 1830-40 censuses there (in 1830 with two sons under the age of 5 and a boy aged 15-20, and Thomas aged 20-30, and in 1840 with two sons aged 10-15, one aged 5-10, and one under the age of 5, with Thomas 30-40); his widow appears as head of the family there in 1850. By 1860 she has remarried and moved her family to Wayne Co., Illinois, where she is listed in the census (as “Mary Davis”) with her family. Thomas died in early 1849 in Wayne Co., Tennessee; his widow was allotted a widow’s year’s provisions by the Wayne Co. Court on 6 February 1849. He had at least five sons:

 

*1. John Hill Burgess (1827-1897) of Wayne Co., IL
2. Thomas J. P. Burgess, also called Lewis Burgess (1827?-1850?) of Wayne Co., TN
3. Henry W. D. Burgess (1834?-1850?) of Wayne Co., TN, died young
4. James C. A. Burgess (1839?-1850+) of Wayne Co., TN
5. William Green Burgess (1845?-1870+) of Wayne Co., IL

 

First Son of Thomas William

 

John Hill Burgess was born on 14 March 1827 in Wayne Co., Tennessee. He married Mary Caroline Williams in 1846 in Wayne Co. He is listed in the 1850 census for Wayne Co., Tennessee, and in 1860-80 in Wayne Co., Illinois, where he moved with his family about 1855. He served in Co. D, 5th Illinois Cavalry, Union Army, during the Civil War. He died there on 7 September 1897, having had three sons:

 

1. William Alexander Burgess (1849-1914) of Jasper Co., MO
2. Hampton Sylvester Burgess (1866-1952) of Wayne Co., IL, who served as an Illinois State Senator
3. Oscar P. Burgess (1869-1895) of Wayne Co., IL

 

Fourth Son of Thomas Henry

 

Gabriel Burgess Sr. was born about 1812, probably in Warren Co., Tennessee. He married his first wife, name unknown, about 1836, and his second wife, Araminta Moore, on 29 April 1841 in Jackson Co., Arkansas. He is listed on the 1834 property tax list of Hickman Co., Kentucky, on the 1837-39 and 1841 tax lists for Van Buren Co., and also in the 1840 census there (with one son and one daughter under the age of 5), near his younger brother, Laru Burgess; and in the 1850 census in Jackson Co., Arkansas. In 1850 an Allen Burgess, age 12, is recorded at the end of his family with no birthplace—he may be a nephew, and in any case appears in no other known record. Gabriel is recorded on an affidavit dated 8 March 1851 attached to the will of George W. Reynolds of Jackson Co. Gabriel’s widow appears there as head of the family in 1860. He died in Jackson Co. on 18 April 1857, having had four sons:

 

1. William Burgess V (1837-1870?) of Jackson Co., AR
2. Larue Burgess II (1846?-1860+), died young?
3. Thomas Henry Burgess V (1853?-1900+) of Jackson Co., AR
4. Gabriel Burgess Jr. (III) (1856?-1892?) of Jackson Co., AR

 

Fifth Son of Thomas Henry

 

Warren Burgess II was born about 1815, probably in Warren Co., Tennessee. He should not be confused with his cousin, Dr. Warren J. Burgess of Perry Co., Illinois (1818-1903). He married Elizabeth Goodnight about 1846, probably in Van Buren Co., Arkansas. He is listed in the 1837, 1841, 1844, 1850-51, and 1855 tax lists of Van Buren Co., Arkansas, and also appears in the 1850 census there ; his widow is listed as head of the family there in 1860. He filed papers with the Federal Land Office to claim 40 acres of land in Van Buren Co. on 1 March 1856. Warren died in Van Buren Co. between 1856-60, having had three sons:

 

1. (Thomas) Henry Burgess IV (1847-1916) of Seminole Co., OK
2. John M. Burgess II (1849-1910+) of Fannin Co., TX
3. Lerew Burgess III (1851-1860+), died young?

 

Third Son of Rev. Thomas Jr.

 

Peter Burgess Sr. was born about 1790, probably in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. If the attribution to him of a daughter, Anna Burgess, wife of Greenberry O’Daniel, is correct (she was born 25 December 1812 in Kentucky and died 1894 in Tate Co., MS), then Peter had to have been born by 1791, and had to have had two wives. Peter married his first wife, name unknown, about 1811 in Hickman Co., KY, and secondly about 1826 to Mary A. Hermann (or Mary A. Hiram; she was born 1805, and died 1878). He is listed in the 1820 census for White Co., Tennessee, with two sons and two daughters under the age of 10, with Peter aged 16-26; and in 1830 in Hickman Co., Kentucky, with two sons under the age of 5, one aged 5-10, two aged 10-15, one daughter aged 5-10, with Peter aged 30-40; the two censuses contradict each other concerning his age.

On 6 September 1822, he witnessed the sale of 70 acres of land in White Co. from his father, Rev. Thomas Burgess, to his brother, Thomas Henry Burgess, with his brothers-in-law, John Cooksey and Philip Kirby, also serving as witnesses. On 31 May 1824 Peter witnessed the survey of a 50-acre plot on Caney Fork in Warren Co., Tennessee, for his father, Rev. Thomas Burgess. He settled in the Beulah Region of Hickman Co., Tennessee about 1825. He appears on the 1825 and 1828-37 property tax lists for Hickman Co. (however, the 1827 list is illegible, and 1830-33 are missing; he owns 160 acres beginning in 1834; his widow appears on the lists from 1840-42, 1844, and 1848-54+).He assumed a mortgage with Benjamin Mason for a 160-acre farm in Hickman Co. on 26 April 1834, and then sold it to James Cash on 19 March 1835. His widow is listed in Hickman Co. as head of the family in 1850, but has not been found in 1840. Peter died in Hickman Co. in 1837 (his estate was appraised there on 16 June 1837), having had at least seven sons, three by his first wife, and four by his second:

 

1. James Clark Burgess (1817?-1865?) of Mississippi Co., MO
2. John Burgess III (1820-1857?) of Hickman Co., KY
3. Hiram Burgess (1823-1882) of Hickman Co., KY
4. Son (1827-1830+) of Hickman Co., KY
5. Roland George Burgess (1829-1896) of Hickman Co., KY
6. Peter Burgess Jr. (1833-1891) of Hickman Co., KY
7. Jesse R. Burgess (1835-1917) of Graves Co., KY

 

Third Branch: William Burgess Sr.

 

William Burgess Sr. was born by 1756 in Orange Co., Virginia (he was at least 21 years of age on 20 November 1777, when he witnessed the sale of 100 acres of land in Halifax Co. to his father). He may have witnessed a deed on the Reedy River in Halifax Co., Virginia on 15 May 1774 between John Willard of the Ninety-Sixth District in South Carolina and Joseph Atkins of Halifax. He married Judith “Judah” Hardin, daughter of Henry Hardin Sr. and his wife Judith, about 1782; both she and William are mentioned in her father’s will, which was written on 25 May 1796 and proved on 16 October 1797 in Pittsylvania Co.

William is listed on the Pittsylvania Co., Virginia personal property tax lists from 1782-1805 (in 1782 with six whites and three slaves), and on the land tax records there from 1786-1805. He purchased his father’s 740-acre estate on the Sweden Fork or Sweetings Fork from his brothers and sisters (except for Timothy Burgess) in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia, on 1 April 1799. He sold 230 acres on Sweden Fork in Pittsylvania Co. on 17 June 1805 to Armstead Stratton, and his remaining land there on 21 October 1805 in two parcels—867 acres to Joseph Motley Sr., and 100 acres to Robert S. Mabrey.

William settled in Lincoln Co., Kentucky, by 23 May 1809, when his son Hardin married there. He is listed there on the 1810 census with two sons aged 16-26, and one aged 26-45. He may be listed with his son, Timothy T. Burgess, in 1820. He died there after 1810 (or 1820), having had at least four sons:

 

1. Son (1783?- )
*2. Hardin Burgess I (1786-1870+) of Ohio Co., KY
*3. William Thomas Burgess Sr. (1789?-1819?) of Breckinridge Co., KY
*4. Timothy T. Burgess Sr. (1791-1879) of Daviess Co., KY

 

Second Son of William Sr.

 

Hardin Burgess I was born on 14 January 1786 (or perhaps 1783), probably in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia (he witnessed a deed between Judah Hardin, widow of Henry Hardin Sr., and James Hardin in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia on 17 September 1804, at which point he should have been at least 21 years of age). He married Tabitha Johnson on 23 May 1809 in Lincoln Co., Kentucky.

Hardin is listed in the 1805 property tax list for Lincoln Co. (as aged 16-21 years), and in the 1810 census for Warren Co., Kentucky, aged 26-45 years, with a wife aged 16-26 and no children, but has not been found in 1820; he is listed in 1830 in Russell Co., Kentucky, next to his brother Timothy T., aged 40-50 years, with one son aged 10-15 years, one aged 5-10, and two under the age of 5; in 1840 in Warren Co., Kentucky, with two sons aged 15-20, two aged 10-15, two aged 5-10, and two under the age of 5; in 1850 in Warren Co., aged sixty-five years, born in Virginia; and in 1860-70 in Ohio Co., Kentucky. He received a land grant in Warren Co. on 28 June 1841. He died between 1870-80 in Ohio Co., Kentucky, having had five sons:

 

1. William J. L. Burgess (1822-1856?) of Warren Co., KY
2. Hardin Geiburg Burgess (1824-1850+) of Boone Co., MO
3. Timothy Burgess IV (1826-1850+) of Warren Co., KY
4. James Geiburg Burgess (1828-1850+) of Warren Co., KY
5. Noel J. Burgess (1834-1908) of Vanderburgh Co., IN

 

Third Son of William Sr.

 

William Thomas Burgess Sr. (also called Thomas Burgess by his descendants and William M. Burgess in one unverified internet record) was born about 1789, probably in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. As “William Burgess” he married Hannah (Wells) Rawlings on 1 April 1813 and/or on 1 April 1815 (listed in the index record as “W. M. Burgess, but this may be a mistranscription of “Wm.”) in Breckinridge Co., Kentucky (her census listings indicate she was born about 1789-93). He is listed as claiming a one-day’s attendance at court there on 13 November 1813. He has not been found in any census. Family tradition says that he left his wife and children about 1819, never to be heard from again. His wife first appears as head of the family in the census records for Breckinridge Co. in 1840, and continues to be listed there through 1870. William had at least two sons:

 

1. Hardin Burgess II (1815-1885) of Meade Co., KY
2. William Thomas Burgess Jr. (1818-1901) of Washington Co., NE

 

Fourth Son of William Sr.

 

Timothy T. Burgess Sr. was born about 1791, probably in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. He married firstly as her second husband Elizabeth Gilbert on 10 August 1815 in Lincoln Co., Kentucky (she had previously married her cousin, John Wesley Gilbert, in 1802—he died in 1813), and secondly Amanda Lee (?) about 1856. He is listed in the 1820 census for Lincoln Co., Kentucky, with one son aged 10-16, and one under the age of 10, plus six daughters, two men, one aged 26-45, and one over the age of 45, and two women (same ages); in 1830 in Russell Co., Kentucky (next door to Hardin Burgess), with one son aged 15-20, one aged 10-15, one aged 5-10, and two under the age of 5 (Timothy aged 40-50); in 1840 in Lincoln Co., Kentucky, with one son aged 20-30, one aged 15-20, and one aged 10-15, plus six daughters, Timothy aged 50-60, and two women aged 50-60; in 1850 in Daviess Co., Kentucky, working as a hotel keeper; in 1860 in McLean Co., Kentucky; and in 1870 in Daviess Co., Kentucky. He served in the Mexican-American War. He is listed in the July and December 1863 federal income tax registers in Kentucky (the county is not stated), working as a hotel keeper. Timothy died in Daviess Co. in January 1879, having had eight sons, five by his first wife, and three by his second:

 

1. Son (1816- )
2. Dr. Warren J. Burgess (1818-1906) of Perry Co., IL; he served as a surgeon in the 17th Kentucky Infantry, Union Army, during the Civil War, and was later crippled; the contemporaneous legend that he had a brother, Henry Volney Burgess, who was actually the Confederate raider William Quantrill, is erroneous, but may apply in part to his brother, Timothy T. Jr.; died childless
3. Dr. Thomas Henry Burgess II (1823-1896) of Perry Co., IL & Bernalillo Co., NM; he served as a Lieut. Colonel in the 18th Illinois Infantry, Union Army, during the Civil War, and died at Albuquerque, NM
4. Timothy T. Burgess Jr. (1825-1899) of Walla Walla Co., WA; he claimed in the 1890 veterans’ census of Walla Walla Co. to have served as a Colonel in the Confederate Army, but his service cannot be verified
5. Son (1827- )
6. Richard Bolivar Burgess (1859-1860+), died young
7. William W. Burgess (1862-1880+) of Daviess Co., KY
8. James W. Burgess (1872-1880+) of Daviess Co., KY

 

Louis Jefferson Burgess is the ancestor of W. E. Burgess;
Robert Thurman Burgess is the ancestor of D. M. Burgess;
Mitchell B. Burgess is the ancestor of J. W. Burgess;
James Melmoth Burgess is the ancestor of L. Burgess;
Thomas Henry Burgess IV is the ancestor of F. O. Burgess;
William Thomas Burgess Jr. is the ancestor of J. H. Burgess;
Hampton Sylvester Burgess is the ancestor of T. J. Burgess.

Test results received from many representatives of this line match each other; they have a common male ancestor, Thomas Burgess Sr. They also match of John Burgess of Union Co., South Carolina; they have a common Burgess ancestor, name unknown. However, one sample does not match the rest, indicating a break in the chain of descent.

If Rev. Thomas Burgess Jr. was born about 1754, then John Burgess of Union Co., South Carolina (who was born about 1769) cannot be his son, and John is too young to be a son of Thomas Burgess Sr.; if, however, Rev. Thomas Jr. was born before 1748, then this relationship becomes possible.

Descendants of this family match the Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype (WAMH), the commonest Y-chromosome DNA signature in North America.

 

Additional information